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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Dominicans Lunch Youth Arm in T&T






The Dominican Order launched its youth arm on September 8, “completing the family here in Trinidad and Tobago”, according to Fr Dwight Black OP. The Dominican Family consists of Friars (Brothers and Priests), Nuns, Sisters, and the Lay-Dominicans (laity), which includes Dominican youth.

The Logo of Dominican Youth Arm
Internationally, the broad goal of the Dominican youth movement is to inculcate within young people the spirituality and vision of St Dominic, founder of the Order, so that they can share in the Order’s mission of preaching the Truth and promoting justice and peace.

The formal launch of the Dominican Youth Movement of Trinidad and Tobago (DYMTT) was the work of a small group of men and women, religious and lay, adult and youth, who share, among other things, the vision of young people passing on God’s Word to other young people. Coordinated by Sr Aluna Abbott, and under the guidance of Fr Dwight and Sr Arlene Greenidge, this team has been meeting for a little over one year.

Hosted by St Dominic’s Children’s Home, the launch began with the celebration of Holy Eucharist which was concelebrated by Fr Dwight and Fr Ferdinand Warner. Then came a Power Point presentation by Fr Dwight who shared the vision, mission and proposed structure of DYMTT. The gathering also caught a glimpse of what young people are capable of as members of the Home’s martial arts group and the music band displayed their giftedness and skills.
One of the evening’s highlights was the slide presentation and testimony of a member of the DYMTT team, Monique Gomez. Monique, led by Sr Aluna and four other members of the team – Leslie Corbie, Nakeshia Quamina, Gillian Garcia and Ricardo Mader – participated in the [International] Dominican Youth Movement (IDYM) World Meeting in Bogota, Colombia, in July. The mission work undertaken by the meeting participants was, for Monique, a most touching experience: “IDYM’s mission work was to preach to the people of the slums of Bogota. It drained you emotionally. That type of poverty is unseen here, very cold weather (5-17 degrees Celsius) and houses with no roofs and dirt floors … it made me appreciate where I live and what I have.”

For more information on DYMTT, check http://dominicanyouthmovement-TT.webs.com or email:dym_tt@yahoo.com .
– Sr Aluna Abbott
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Keep Faith From Becoming Ideology

Pope Francis: Heartfelt Prayer 





When Christianity becomes an ideology rather than a faith based on a relationship with God, its followers become proud and rigid, Pope Francissaid.

When Christianity becomes an ideology, “Jesus isn’t there, nor is his tenderness, love and meekness. And ideologies are always rigid, always,” the pope said during an October morning Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae, where he lives.

According to a Vatican Radio report on the homily, Pope Francis said that ideological Christians are “rigid, moralists, ethicists, but without goodness.”

“When a Christian becomes a disciple of an ideology, he has lost his faith; he is no longer a disciple of Jesus, but of this way of thinking,” the pope said.

Pope Francis was commenting on the day’s Gospel reading from Luke (11:47-54) in which Jesus admonishes the scribes and Pharisees for trying to control the faith rather than live it and share it with others.

The Gospel reading included the line: “Woe to you, scholars of the law! You have taken away the key of knowledge. You yourselves did not enter and you stopped those trying to enter.”

Pope Francis said when Christianity is an ideology rather than a faith built on a living relationship with the Lord, “knowledge of Jesus is transformed into an ideological and moralistic knowledge.”

The ideologues close the door to faith with all their rules, he said.

“The key that opens the door of faith is prayer,” he said. “I am talking about praying, not saying prayers,” because the Pharisees recited many prayers in public simply to be seen. Jesus warned his disciples not to follow their example because prayer should be a “heart-to-heart” meeting with the Lord.

Pope Francis said the “poor” Pharisees were “people sullied by pride. Let’s ask the Lord for the grace first of all to never stop praying in order not to lose faith, but also to remain humble.”



— Pope Francis: Heartfelt Prayer Keeps Faith From Becoming Ideology

When Christianity becomes an ideology rather than a faith based on a relationship with God, its followers become proud and rigid, @[167339613419254:274:Pope Francis] said.

When Christianity becomes an ideology, “Jesus isn’t there, nor is his tenderness, love and meekness. And ideologies are always rigid, always,” the pope said during an October morning Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae, where he lives.

According to a Vatican Radio report on the homily, Pope Francis said that ideological Christians are “rigid, moralists, ethicists, but without goodness.”

“When a Christian becomes a disciple of an ideology, he has lost his faith; he is no longer a disciple of Jesus, but of this way of thinking,” the pope said.

Pope Francis was commenting on the day’s Gospel reading from Luke (11:47-54) in which Jesus admonishes the scribes and Pharisees for trying to control the faith rather than live it and share it with others.

The Gospel reading included the line: “Woe to you, scholars of the law! You have taken away the key of knowledge. You yourselves did not enter and you stopped those trying to enter.”

Pope Francis said when Christianity is an ideology rather than a faith built on a living relationship with the Lord, “knowledge of Jesus is transformed into an ideological and moralistic knowledge.”

The ideologues close the door to faith with all their rules, he said.

“The key that opens the door of faith is prayer,” he said. “I am talking about praying, not saying prayers,” because the Pharisees recited many prayers in public simply to be seen. Jesus warned his disciples not to follow their example because prayer should be a “heart-to-heart” meeting with the Lord.

Pope Francis said the “poor” Pharisees were “people sullied by pride. Let’s ask the Lord for the grace first of all to never stop praying in order not to lose faith, but also to remain humble.”


(Catholic News Service / Cindy Wooden)

https://www.facebook.com/PopeFrancisPage






#PopeFrancis #Jesus #Pope #Papa #Love #Christian #God #Sin #Redemption #Forgiveness #Cristo #Faith #Francis #Assisi

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

A Priest Who Opens Mind





We continue our series of articles celebrating the anniversaries of the first graduates of the Seminary – Msgr Urban Peschier, Fr Fred Patience and Bishop John Mendes, as well as the 70th anniversary of the opening of the Seminary. The Diocesan Fathers invite readers to journey with parishioners from each of the vicariates as they reflect on the ministry of six parish priests. Borrowing the theme from the celebration – COME CELEBRATE, JOIN US IN SERVICE, it is hoped that the series will help stimulate volunteers for Vocations Committees in parishes to creatively foster a vocations culture: a culture of “yes” to service in general and priesthood in particular.


THE EASTERN VICARIATE

The community of Salybia is within the parish of Toco/Matelot and, according to lay minister Sharine Gerald, it comprises 14 people. There is her family of six, a grandmother and granddaughter, a family of three, a mother and daughter, and a single lady. But small as it is, this community is bubbling with excitement about its parish and parish priest, Fr Steve Ransome.
Fr Steve Ransome
Fr Steve Ransome
Fr Ransome celebrates Mass every second and fourth Sunday at Playa del Este on the Salybia Main Road and, on the other Sundays, Sharine leads a Eucharistic Service. She is bowled over by Fr Ransome’s open-mindedness and approach to vocation on the whole. She says he has opened the minds of the parishioners to see vocation as a call to holiness in every aspect of life and profession. “He doesn’t let us feel as if vocation is for older persons or for over-religious persons but that vocation is a part of life,” she explained.
Sharine said when Fr Ransome is approached, he gives a sense of comfort. He has been encouraging older men to be lectors and to be visibly involved in the life of the Church and that has brought out a positive response from the young men of the parish. She noted that prior to Fr Ransome’s arrival, her two brothers did not regularly attend Mass but now they want to come to church all the time, so much so that when they miss Mass they are close to tears.
Sharine explained that parishioners have found a good example in the way Fr Ransome lives his life as a priest. She said he shares his leadership and that is a part of his approach that has had a great impact on the parish. He doesn’t want to do everything himself but has opened up the leadership to parishioners, allowing them to come into their own. He tends not to micro-manage and is open-minded.
Sharine was asked how Fr Ransome’s presence has encouraged her call to service as a lay minister. She shared that he is a listener and pays attention and that has helped her advance.
I asked Sharine what she wished for Fr Ransome and she said she had a general wish for all priests. She wants them to be guided by the Holy Spirit and to seek always to do God’s work. She wishes that nothing external or opposed to God will pull them away from what God wants them to do.
Speaking specifically about Fr Ransome, she says she would like his dreams for the development of the youth of the parish to come to fruition. She adds that she knows his aim is to see a vibrant parish, not just a charismatic parish but one interwoven with the togetherness that comes from being truly alive!
– Natasha Lamy-Ramsde

A Spiritual Retreat





Frs Hugh Joyeau (left) and Wilfred John enjoy a chat at the retreat, while Frs Ken Assing and Ferdinand Warner OP sit in the background looking out to sea. Photo Fr Michael Cockburn.
Frs Hugh Joyeau (left) and Wilfred John enjoy a chat at the retreat, while Frs Ken Assing and Ferdinand Warner OP sit in the background looking out to sea. Photo Fr Michael Cockburn.
Priests of the archdiocese took some time off from their regular duties and journeyed to Mayaro for a spiritual retreat, between September 30 and October 3. Prayer, sharing the Word and reflecting on the spiritual life were all key features of the exercise – but just spending time with one another was another major element of the retreat. Some 28 priests participated in the retreat which had as its overall theme “Sharing the Spirit”. Reflections by one member each of the Carmelite, Dominican and the Fransalian communities, the diocesan fathers and the Fraternity of Priests (a movement active in the archdiocese since 1987) gave the retreat its basic structure and offered the priests a deeper appreciation of one another's spirituality.
It was the first retreat for priests of the archdiocese since the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI and the inauguration of Pope Francis, whose recent interview, A Big Heart Open to God, offered another point of significant discussion and deep

Dominican Friar Opens Session of the U.S. House of Representatives With Prayer

  Fr. Andrew Hofer, O.P. on CSpan


With a compromise to end the shutdown on the horizon, Fr. Andrew Hofer, O.P., Master of Students and professor of theology at the Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception, began the October 15, 2013 session of the 113th Congress with an opening prayer before the U.S. House of Representatives. 

All-powerful and merciful God, we ask you to pour forth your Spirit of blessings upon the world, which you have freely made, this nation, which trusts in you, and upon all here on Capitol Hill, who turn to you.
We have been wrong, and we have sinned. Give us all a share of your wisdom and your mercy. Enlighten us so that we can turn from our error and live by the power of your truth. Strengthened by you, may we stand united in necessary matters, acknowledge liberty in doubtful matters, and be charitable in all matters.
We ask this of you, the source of all unity, liberty, and charity, to whom be glory and honor now and forever. Amen.

Monday, October 14, 2013

Three Brothers Make Their First Profession in Seville


Juan Manuel Martinez Corral, Francisco Perez de Pieri, and Salvador Nguema Nguema Nchama made their first profession as Dominicans on 15 September.

The first one did for the province of Andalusia, the second to that of Aragon, and the third to that of Spain. The celebration was presided by Miguel de Burgos, prior provincial of Andalusia, and was held at the St. Thomas Aquinas Convent of Seville. It is in this community where the three brothers have made their novitiate and now have made his simple profession for a period of one year. Nixon Diaz, the other novice the period 2012/2013 made his profession in the Dominican Republic, his country of origin. In this celebration, De Burgos useful to remember the importance of mercy to those who were about to profess.
The whole family tucked dominica Juan Manuel, Francisco and Savior in this important step of their religious life. Were present who has been his novice master, Carmelo Preciado, and along with it the master of prenovices, Salustiano Mateos, and what will be their student teacher, Manuel Santos. Also went Oscar Jesus Fernandez, secretary of the province of Spain, Javier Carballo delegation, prior provincial. They also wanted to clothe three novices former faithful who carry out their activities through organizations related to the Dominicans and tied to this community in the heart of Seville.
And of course, after the professions was no opportunity to enjoy a snack and fellowship to celebrate this important step of Fray Juan Manuel, Fray Francisco Perez and Salvador Ngema fray. From now on, will be part of students in Valencia, where he studied theology in the coming years. We wish them every success.

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Irish Vocations Newsletter for October


"Dominican Connect" for October 2013 has been published
"Dominican Connect" for October 2013 has been published

October's "Dominican Connect" , the monthly newsletter from the Irish Dominican friars' vocations office, focuses on the vocations good news at the beginning of the academic year.
Featuring photos from the vestitions and professions in September, the principal message is on the front page, also in the form of a picture, showing the large group of men in formation with the Irish Dominicans - 19 to be exact. 
There is also news of a Franciscan profession (twin brother of one of our Dominican brothers), advance notice of the St Martin de Porres novenas in our churches and the 770th anniversary of the arrival of the Dominicans in Tralee. 
The featured friar is Fr Tom Lawson OP, a native of Dundalk and at present living in our mission in Trinidad.
Follow this link to download a copy of October 2013's Dominican Connect:
- See more at: http://www.op.org/en/content/irish-vocations-newsletter-october#sthash.dmLYyhhP.dpuf

Fr Francesco La Vecchia Has Been Appointed as the Provincial of the Province of St Thomas Aquinas in Italy.

Francesco La Vecchia

The Master of the Order, fr Bruno Cadoré has appointed fr Francesco La Vecchia as the Prior Provincial of the Province of St Thomas Aquinas in Italy. Fr Francesco has accepted the election according to the regular norms.
Fr Francesco was born at Messina (south of Italy) in 1972. He entered the Order at Firenze in 1991 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1997. He studied Philosophy at the Pontifical University of St Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum), Choral Direction and Composition of Sacred Music at the Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music, Oriental Ecclesiastical Sciences at the Pontifical Institute of Oriental Studies, all in Rome. He has taught at the Pontifical Seminary of Pius XI in Reggio Calabria and at the Interprovincial Faculty of Philosophy at Napoli. He established a School of Theology for the Laity at the mandate of the Diocese of Mileto-Nicotera-Troppa in 2001.
In the province, he has served as; Promoter of Preaching, Superior of the community and Rector of the Shrine of the Basilica of St Dominic, Soriano Calabro, Superior of the community and Rector of the Shrine of the Basilica of Santa Maria della Coltura and Master of Students at the Interprovincial House of Studies at Napoli.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Featuring Trini Dominican Brother: Bro. Jesse Maingot OP


A Marian Reality

"When the Holy Spirit finds Mary in a soul, He flies to it. He enters therein and communicates Himself to that soul in abundance."
~St. Louis Grignion de Montfort

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

The Vocabulary of Vocation


    The Language of Vocation

    In the world of vocation many words are used with unfamiliar means leaving one at times to guess the meaning of these words. This article aims to demystify the language of Vocation Promotion. Enjoy!
    Vocation: Vocation means a call. It is God’s invitation, His call to each person to love and serve Him and His Church in a particular state or way of life. Each person's vocation flows from the grace of Baptism.
    Discernment: When talking about discovering your vocation, discernment means the process of that discovery through prayer, reflection and discussion as to how God calls each person to love Him, whether as a priest, a consecrated religious man or woman, a married person or a consecrated single person.
    Brother: Brothers live in religious communities. They take vows and promise to use their talents to serve God wherever the community decides they are needed. Brothers are not ordained.
    Charism: Each religious community has a charism or unique way of returning God's love to Him and His people which manifests a particular attribute of God's being.
    Apostolate: The type of work or mission of the order through which their particular charism is lived out.
    Consecrated Life: A permanent state of life recognized by the Church, entered freely in response to the call of Christ to the perfection of love and characterized by the making of public vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.
    Laity: People within the Church including religious brothers and sisters as well as all other single and married person who are not ordained as bishop, priests or deacons are known as the laity or the lay faithful.
    Secular Institute: Single lay men and women, and also some priests, belong to secular institutes. They make a commitment to live the evangelical counsels of poverty, chastity and obedience. Members do not necessarily live together as a community. Their goal is to be a transforming presence in society.
    Holy Orders: The Sacrament by which the mission entrusted by Christ to His Apostles continues to be excercised in the Church through the laying on of hands. By receiving Holy Orders men become members of the ordained clergy - deacons, priests and bishops. All three confer a permanent, sacramental character on the man who is ordained.
    Permanent Deacon: A degree of the Sacrament of Holy Orders, after bishop and priest. The permanent deacon is ordained for ministry, but not to the priesthood. He assists and preaches at Mass, baptizes and presides at weddings and funerals. They have jobs outside the Church to make a living. Men at least 35 years of age, married or single, may be ordained permanent deacons.
    Transitional Deacon: Men who are called to the priesthood who are in the final stage of formation before being ordained as priests. They receive the Sacrament of Holy Orders and usually serve as deacons for one year before ordination to the priesthood. During their year as a deacon they continue their studies and serve in parish assignments.
    Priest: A man is ordained to priesthood through the Sacrament of Holy Orders. Together each man and the Church discern (discover) whether or not he is called to become a priest. Diocesan priests a called to serve the people of a particular diocese. Men called to be priests in religious orders belong to communities and in addition to receiving the Sacrament of Holy Orders they also take vows of poverty, chastity and odedience (the three evangelical counsels).
    Religious Life: Priests, brothers or sisters living in communities that embrace the spirituality, charism and teachings of the community’s founder call their way of life religious life. Members of these communities follow Jesus through taking vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. They grow in holiness through their gift of themselves to God and His people.
    Religious Community: The founder of a religious community brings together a group of men or women who share the same charism and are dedicated to the same mission in the Church. These are religious communities of priests and brothers and communities of sisters. The apostolates of the communities vary according to their mission. Those dedicated primarily to prayer are contemplative communities; those who combine prayer with apostolic ministries are called active communities.
    Postulant: The first formal stage of becoming a consecrated religious is called a postulant. The postulancy stage usually takes six months to a year.
    Novice: A man or woman in the second formal stage of becoming a consecrated religious is called a novice. This stage of the novitiate usually takes one to two years.
    Sister: Sisters belong to religious communities and are brides of Christ who are chosen by Him to love Him and serve His Church like His Mother Mary as virgins and spiritual mothers. They serve the Church in whatever ways their superiors decide is best given their talents and inclinations.
    Nun: Nuns are sisters and brides of Christ who are called by Him to pray and serve the needs of the Church in a more hidden way. They live in cloistered communities and do not leave their convents for any outside apostolates.
    Vows: Formal commitments made to God to follow Jesus in His poverty, chastity and obedience as members of religious communities.By the vow of poverty the members hold all things in common. The community takes care of each other’s needs through the providence of God and their our charity. The vow of chastity means that the member gives up the goods of marriage and marital relations for the sake of God’s kingdom. The vow of obedience allows the member of the community to imitate and share in Jesus’ obedience to His Father in order to accomplish His will. (Diocesan priests live the spirit of the counsels by promising to live in celibate chastity, obedience to their bishop and a simple life.)

    We hope the you would more aware of these terms used in the promotion of vocation.

Sunday, October 6, 2013

Come Celebrate

We continue today the series of articles celebrating the anniversaries of the first graduates of the Seminary – Msgr Urban Peschier, Fr Fred Patience and Bishop John Mendes, as well as the 70th anniversary of the opening of the Seminary. The Diocesan Fathers invite readers to journey with parishioners from each of the vicariates as they reflect on the ministry of six parish priests. Borrowing the theme from the celebration – COME CELEBRATE, JOIN US IN SERVICE, it is hoped that the series will help stimulate volunteers for Vocations Committees in parishes to creatively foster a vocations culture: a culture of “yes” to service in general and priesthood in particular.
FLASHBACK: Fr Steve Duncan waves to parishioners at the recent Tobago Vicariate Family Day.
FLASHBACK: Fr Steve Duncan waves to parishioners at the recent Tobago Vicariate Family Day.
THE TOBAGO VICARIATE
“In Tobago, we’ve always waited for a priest to come from somewhere – from Ireland, from England, even from Trinidad – but this time our priest is one of our very own! We thank God for that. We needed that!”
These were the words of Ingrid Melville from Scarborough in the Tobago Vicariate. In Ingrid’s words, “We now see from Fr Steve’s example that a priest can come from our own families, our own community.”
Ingrid shared that she grew up with Fr Steve Duncan. They were both from Delaford and she says the Tobagonians of both the Sacred Heart parish at Delaford and the St Joseph parish at Scarborough can now say they know the priest – they know his family, they know his cousins, they feel he is their very own. Ingrid and Fr Steve went to the same school and attended the same church and she has always known him to be humble. This, she says, has gone a long way with the Catholic communities across Tobago, for Fr Steve has tried to unite the two parishes and with tremendous success.
Ingrid shared that Fr Steve has planned and, with the people’s help, executed activities to bring the two parishes together and to build unity between the two. There was a Family Day at Castara recently and she says everyone was there – people from Goodwood, Mt St George, Patience Hill, Mason Hall, etc. She said it was a rainy day and Tobagonians would normally have stayed at home but this time they were inspired to attend.
There is a lime with Fr Steve one Friday every month and it is open to the youth and especially young men. They get to socialise with a priest in a relaxed atmosphere.
A concert is being planned for Goodwood, which is a halfway point between Scarborough and Delaford, and there is full participation in the current preparations. Also on the drawing board is “Meet the Parish Priest” – a journey from community to community beginning at Scarborough and ending at Delaford. This way, parishioners will get to meet with Fr Steve in a more intimate setting.
A Vicariate choir is being organised and rehearsals have started. Ingrid said there was much interest and excitement at the rehearsals.
She added that their journey with Fr Steve has caused the people of the Tobago Vicariate to look forward to their own sons taking up the vocation of priesthood. She says, “The presence of Fr Steve himself makes vocations closer to us.”
In the schools of the Vicariate – Scarborough RC and Delaford RC, there is a move to form a Tobago Board for Catholic Education and it is hoped that this would help promote priestly vocations. The priesthood has not been represented at recent career days at the schools.
Ingrid said someone once told Fr Steve, “You will either be a priest or a politician.”
She and the Tobago Vicariate are happy God called him to be a priest!
Happy ninth anniversary Fr. Steve.
– Natasha Lamy-Ramsden

Visiting Dominicans Brothers

Spending some Days in this Dominican Community.

St Catherine’s Priory, Newry














Tuesday, October 1, 2013

RIP to a Great Priest

Praying for the Repose of the Soul of my former parish priest Fr Knolly Knox CSSp who passed away last night Sep 29th 2013
“A most humble human being, Fr Knolly Knox’s life has been founded on strong moral principles and has been devoted to the service of others and the service of God.

He is one of three children of his parents, the late Hector and Juliana Knox – the others being his late brother Anselm Knox who served in World War II and his sister Electra Harris.

Fr Knolly received his early education at Rosary Boys’ and Nelson Street Boys’ RC before going on to St Mary’s College, following his successful completion of the School Exhibition.

Fr Knox was ordained at the Holy Ghost Fathers’ Missionary College in Ireland on July 15, 1951…after ordination Fr Knolly returned to Trinidad to assume a teaching position at St Mary’s College. Like other great teachers, Fr Knolly led his students to the discovery of their own wisdom by his example. His own life is directed by strong values of integrity, truth, commitment, discipline, respect for others and, most importantly, family life. These values he happily passed on to his many students over the years. “I encouraged the boys to achieve their full potential… I encouraged them to be good, responsible men; men who would contribute to improving our society, men who would make a difference to the lives of others.”

Fr Knox assumed responsibility for his first parish, St Anthony’s in Petit Valley, in 1974, following his retirement from active teaching at St Mary’s College. As the parish priest of St Anthony’s for eight years, he admits to cultivating many cherished and enduring friendships among his parishioners. He left Petit Valley parish in 1982 to become the parish priest of St John the Baptist Church in San Juan. Eight years later, in 1990, the late Archbishop Anthony Pantin reassigned him to St Anthony’s parish in Petit Valley, much to the delight of his friends and parishioners there. After spending another nine enjoyable and productive years at St Anthony’s Fr Knox was given the responsibility of parish priest of the Church of the Assumption in Maraval.

His own life, he said, was a combination of love and support from many quarters. “I am fortunate to have a lot of people to thank for my own life over the years. Foremost among them would be my parents, who supported me throughout my life and who supported perhaps the most important decision of my life; the Holy Ghost Fathers and my friends, among them my parishioners. I believe that God has put each of us here on this earth for a reason. We each need to discover what that reason is, and work toward fulfilling it, so that when we move on from this life, we would have had no regrets, but the satisfaction of knowing that we have fulfilled our duty as human beings.”(quoted from the Catholic News of Trinidad & Tobago, July 16th 2011, on the occasion of Fr. Knox's 60th Anniversary of Priestly ordination)

Fr Knox, died last night; may his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in Peace and may the life and testimony of Fr. Knox in the Classroom and in the Parishes where he served, inspire many young men to follow Jesus as Spiritan Priests. Amen